DepEd Projected Classroom Shortages in Case of Limited to Full Face-to-Face Classes

Attached is an Aide Memoire from DepEd Undersecretary Alain Del B. Pascua on the Projected Classroom Shortages in Case of Limited to Full Face-to-Face Classes.

Projected Classroom Shortages in Case of Limited to Full Face-to-Face Classes

Introduction

In consideration of the possible implementation of limited face-to-face classes for the incoming School Year 2021-2022, the Department of Education (DepEd) has analyzed the challenges it may encounter, particularly in terms of classroom shortage. In this regard, the DepEd Planning Service (PS) and Education Facilities Division (EFD) present the data on classroom shortages and sufficiency, given the following schedule of classes:

SectionMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
1Face-to-faceStudy at
home
Face-to-face Study at
home
Face-to-face Study at
home
2Study at
home
Face-to-face Study at
home
Face-to-face Study at
home
Face-to-face

Data on Classroom Shortages in Different Scenarios

This set of data details the implications of implementing single and double-shift classes in different scenarios:

Single shift classes with 1 classroom to 20 students. If there are 40 learners in a classroom, they will be divided into two (2) batches. During the school week, the two batches shall take turns in physically attending classes based on their assigned schedule. Twenty (20) learners will physically go to school every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (MWF), and the other 20 learners every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday (TTTS).

When learners are not attending face-to-face classes, they shall study at home.

This setup will ensure that both learners and teachers are better protected from COVID-19 because it will help facilitate proper social distancing given the smaller class size physically reporting to school on a given day. This will also leave more time for the disinfection of materials and facilities. Further, this will allow teachers to focus more on the individual needs of learners.

While positive outcomes are expected, this setup will exacerbate classroom shortages as a total of 506,172 classrooms should be constructed for them to be properly implemented. The table below shows actual figures on classroom shortages per grade level.

Single Shift Classes (1 Classroom to 20 Students)

LevelClassroom Shortage
Kinder76,802
Grade 1-10379,068
Senior High School50,302
Total506,172

Double shift classes with 1 classroom to 20 students. If there are 40 learners in a classroom, they will be divided into two (2) batches to physically attend classes per day. Twenty 20 learners will physically attend classes in the morning from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., and the other 20 learners in the afternoon from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. To accommodate the maximum number of 40 students per classroom in a day, daily classes will be compressed into five (5) hours.

This will help accommodate more learners within a school day. Teachers and learners will have some protection against the virus as social distancing will still be practiced per shift. However, unlike single shift classes, this does not leave enough time for the disinfection of materials and facilities.

In this setup, a total of 128,529 classrooms should be constructed to ensure its proper implementation. The table below shows more details:

Double Shift Classes (1 Classroom to 20 Students)

LevelClassroom Shortage
Kinder12,837
Grade 1-10106,325
Senior High School9,367
Total128,529

Single shift classes with 1 classroom to 40 students, maximum of 45. This setup will follow the schedule of item no. 1, except it will accommodate 40-45 learners, instead of 20 per classroom. Given this number, the implementation of social distancing will be minimal to none at all. However, sanitation may still be conducted after class hours.

If there will be 40-45 students in a classroom per day, 126,362 classrooms are needed to be constructed. The following table details classroom shortages in this setup:

Single Shift Classes (1 Classroom to 40 Students, Maximum of 45)

LevelClassroom Shortage
Kinder10,670
Grade 1-10106,325
Senior High School9,367
Total126,362

Double shift classes with 1 classroom to 40 students, maximum of 45). This setup will follow the schedule of item no. 2 except it will accommodate 40-45 learners, instead of 20 per classroom. Given this number, the implementation of social distancing will be minimal to none at all. Further, it does not leave enough time for the sanitation of materials and facilities between classes.

In this scenario, where 80-90 learners will be in a classroom per day, a total of 41,513 classrooms should be constructed. Please refer to the table below for details on classroom shortages.

Double Shift Classes (1 Classroom to 40 Students, Maximum of 45)

LevelClassroom Shortage
Kinder3,794
Grade 1-1035,827
Senior High School1,892
Total41,513

Data on Classroom Sufficiency

While there are schools that will experience classroom shortages in all of the mentioned scenarios, there are still those with a sufficient number of classrooms that may accommodate the indicated number of students per day. The table below summarizes the numbers per scenario:

ScenarioClassroom ShortageNumber of Schools with Sufficient ClassroomsNumber of Schools with
Classroom Shortages
Single Shift (1 Classroom to 20 Students)506,17230,11817,303
Double Shift (1 Classroom to 20 Students)128,52934,36613,055
Single Shift (1 Classroom to 40 Students, Maximum of 45)126,36234,65812,763
Double Shift (1 Classroom to 40 Students, Maximum of 45)41,51339,9777,744

In all of the scenarios, the number of schools with classroom shortages is significantly lower than those with sufficient classrooms.

Data on Top Cities and Towns with the Highest Classroom Shortages Relative to Different Scenarios

The following information shows the top 10 cities with the highest number of learners. This directly correlates with the data on classroom shortages.

Single shift classes with 1 classroom to 20 students. Given its large student population, Quezon City tops the list of cities with the highest cases of classroom shortage in this scenario. The other cities on the list also have a high population density. The table below lists the top 10 cities and the number of classroom shortages.

RegionDivisionMunicipalityShortage
NCRQuezon City Quezon City 8,956
XIDavao City Davao City 7,790
NCRCaloocan City Caloocan City 7,136
IXZamboanga City Zamboanga City 5,872
IV-AAntipolo City Antipolo City 5,727
NCRTaguig City Taguig City 4,490
VIICebu City (Capital) Cebu City (Capital) 4,012
IV-ACity of Damasrinas City of Damasrinas 3,809
NCRCity of Valenzuela City of Valenzuela 3,739
XCagayan De Oro City (Capital) Cagayan De Oro City (Capital) 3,608

Double-shift classes with 1 classroom to 20 students. In this scenario, Antipolo City tops the list as it would need 2,094 additional classrooms for proper implementation of classes. Please refer to the following table for more details:

RegionDivisionMunicipalityShortage
IV-AAntipolo CityCity of Antipolo2,094
XIDavao CityDavao City1,954
NCRTaguigTaguig City1,530
NCRCaloocan CityCaloocan City1,481
IXZamboanga CityZamboanga City1,432
IV-ADasmarinas CityCity of Dasmarinas1,297
NCRParanaque CityCity of Paranaque1,177
NCRValenzuela CityCity of Valenzuela1,153
NCRQuezon CityQuezon City1,131
IV-ARizalRodriguez (Montalban)933

Single-shift classes with 1 classroom to 40 students, maximum of 45. Like the second scenario, Antipolo City tops this list. A total of 2,031 classrooms has to be constructed to accommodate the indicated number of learners. The table below shows the data on other cities.

RegionDivisionMunicipalityShortage
IV-AAntipolo CityCity of Antipolo2,031
XIDavao CityDavao City1,900
NCRTaguigTaguig City1,479
NCRCaloocan CityCaloocan City1,431
IXZamboanga CityZamboanga City1,398
IV-ADasmarinas CityCity of Dasmarinas1,263
NCRParanaque CityCity of Paranaque1,147
NCRValenzuela CityCity of Valenzuela1,116
NCRQuezon CityQuezon City1,114
IV-ARizalRodriguez (Montalban)902

Double-shift classes with 1 classroom to 40 students, maximum of 45. In this scenario, Davao City has the highest case of classroom shortages as 594 classrooms will be required for the proper class implementation. Like previous scenarios, most of the top cities are located in NCR. The table below also shows that other cities in Visayas and Mindanao will experience classroom shortages even in this scenario.

RegionDivisionMunicipalityShortage
XIDavao CityDavao City594
IV-AAnti polo CityCity Of Anti polo525
IXZamboanga CityZamboanga City474
IV-ADasmarinas CityCity Of Dasmarinas354
NCRParanaque CityCity Of Paranaque349
NCRCaloocan CityKalookan City307
NCRTaguigTaguig City294
CARAGAButuan CityButuan City (Capital)259
XIIKidapawan CityCity Of Kidapawan (Capital)242
IV-ACalamba CityCity Of Calamba219

Conclusion

No matter the given scenario, the issue of classroom shortage is very evident. Classroom shortages range from as low as 41,513 to as high as 506,172.

In terms of schools, the number of sites with classroom shortages will range from as low as 7,744 (16.33%) to as high as 17,303 (36.49%).

With these figures, the construction of new classrooms must still continue and be given appropriate funding.

Due to limited school buildable spaces, these figures support the construction of High Rise School Buildings in urban centers, particularly in cities where classroom shortage is very evident and that the needed land for expansion is prohibitive.

READ MORE:

DepEd Basic Information on Plantilla Positions FY 2021

DepEd Basic Education Statistics for School Year 2020-2021

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